St Mary Magdalene Enfield Sanctuary

Weekly Online Service
30 August 2020 The Twelfth Sunday after Trinity

Please find below our service for this week. You can also click on the PDF button to open and download a copy of the printed generic Service booklet.

You will find an opening hymn - words are included. This is followed by the service. Finally there is a closing hymn. Please feel free to follow along in whichever way you feel most comfortable. Words in bold are for everyone to join in.

Hymn

Father, Lord of all creation

Father, Lord of all creation,
ground of being, life and love;
Height and depth beyond description,
only life in you can prove:
You are mortal life's dependence:
thought, speech, sight are ours by grace;
Yours is every hour's existence,
sovereign Lord of time and space.

Jesus Christ, the man for others
we, your people, make our prayer
help us love, as sisters, brothers
all whose burdens we can share
where your name binds us together
you, Lord Christ, will surely be
where no selfishness can sever
there you love the world may see.

Holy Spirit, rushing, bringing
wind and flame of Penteocst
fire our hearts afresh with yearning
to regain what we have lost
may your love unite our action
nevermore to spea k alone
God, in us, abolish faction
God, through us, your love make known.

Service Audio

In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit

All say Amen.

Grace, mercy and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ be with you

and also with you.

Almighty God,
to whom all hearts are open, all desires known,
and from whom no secrets are hidden:
cleanse the thoughts of our hearts
by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
that we may perfectly love you,
and worthily magnify your holy name;
through Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Prayers of Penitence

God so loved the world that he gave his only Son Jesus Christ to save us from our sins, to be our advocate in heaven, and to bring us to eternal life.

Let us confess our sins in penitence and faith, firmly resolved to keep God’s commandments and to live in love and peace with all.

Almighty God, our heavenly Father,
we have sinned against you
and against our neighbour
in thought and word and deed,
through negligence, through weakness,
through our own deliberate fault.
We are truly sorry and repent of all our sins.
For the sake of your Son Jesus Christ,
who died for us, forgive us all that is past
and grant that we may serve you in newness of life
to the glory of your name.  Amen.

Almighty God,
who forgives all who truly repent,
have mercy upon you,
pardon and deliver you from all your sins,
confirm and strengthen you in all goodness,
and keep you in life eternal;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Gloria in Excelcis

Glory to God, Glory to God,
Glory to God in the highest.

Glory to God in the highest,
and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King,
almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks,
we praise you for your glory.

Glory to God, Glory to God,
Glory to God in the highest.

Lord Jesus Christ,
only Son of the Father,
Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world:
have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand
of the Father:
receive our prayer.

Glory to God, Glory to God,
Glory to God in the highest.

For you alone are the Holy One,
you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ,
with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father.

Glory to God, Glory to God,
Glory to God in the highest.

The Collect of the Day is said or sung.

Almighty and everlasting God, you are always more ready to hear than we to pray and to give more than either we desire or deserve: pour down upon us the abundance of your mercy, forgiving us those things of which our conscience is afraid and giving us those good things which we are not worthy to ask but through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

The Old and New Testament Readings

Exodus 3.1-15 - Read by Alison Reeve

Moses was keeping the flock of his father-in-law Jethro, the priest of Midian; he led his flock beyond the wilderness, and came to Horeb, the mountain of God. 2 There the angel of the Lord appeared to him in a flame of fire out of a bush; he looked, and the bush was blazing, yet it was not consumed. 3 Then Moses said, ‘I must turn aside and look at this great sight, and see why the bush is not burned up.’ 4 When the Lord saw that he had turned aside to see, God called to him out of the bush, ‘Moses, Moses!’ And he said, ‘Here I am.’ 5 Then he said, ‘Come no closer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.’ 6 He said further, ‘I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.’ And Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.

7 Then the Lord said, ‘I have observed the misery of my people who are in Egypt; I have heard their cry on account of their taskmasters. Indeed, I know their sufferings, 8 and I have come down to deliver them from the Egyptians, and to bring them up out of that land to a good and broad land, a land flowing with milk and honey, to the country of the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites. 9 The cry of the Israelites has now come to me; I have also seen how the Egyptians oppress them. 10 So come, I will send you to Pharaoh to bring my people, the Israelites, out of Egypt.’ 11 But Moses said to God, ‘Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh, and bring the Israelites out of Egypt?’ 12 He said, ‘I will be with you; and this shall be the sign for you that it is I who sent you: when you have brought the people out of Egypt, you shall worship God on this mountain.’

13 But Moses said to God, ‘If I come to the Israelites and say to them, “The God of your ancestors has sent me to you”, and they ask me, “What is his name?” what shall I say to them?’ 14 God said to Moses, ‘I am who I am.’ He said further, ‘Thus you shall say to the Israelites, “I am has sent me to you.” ’ 15 God also said to Moses, ‘Thus you shall say to the Israelites, “The Lord, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you”:
This is my name for ever,
and this my title for all generations.

This is the word of the Lord.

Thanks be to God.

Romans 12.9-21 - Read by Luke Reeve

Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; 10 love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honour. 11 Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord.12Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer. 13 Contribute to the needs of the saints; extend hospitality to strangers.

14 Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. 15 Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep. 16 Live in harmony with one another; do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly; do not claim to be wiser than you are. 17 Do not repay anyone evil for evil, but take thought for what is noble in the sight of all. 18 If it is possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all. 19 Beloved, never avenge yourselves, but leave room for the wrath of God; for it is written, ‘Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord.’ 20 No, ‘if your enemies are hungry, feed them; if they are thirsty, give them something to drink; for by doing this you will heap burning coals on their heads.’ 21 Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

This is the word of the Lord.

Thanks be to God.

The Gospel

Matthew 16.21-28 - Read by Bryan Ward

All sing: Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia!

The Gospel reader says

Hear the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew

All say: Glory to you, O Lord.

From that time on, Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and undergo great suffering at the hands of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised. 22 And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him, saying, ‘God forbid it, Lord! This must never happen to you.’ 23 But he turned and said to Peter, ‘Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling-block to me; for you are setting your mind not on divine things but on human things.’

24 Then Jesus told his disciples, ‘If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 25 For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it. 26 For what will it profit them if they gain the whole world but forfeit their life? Or what will they give in return for their life?

27 ‘For the Son of Man is to come with his angels in the glory of his Father, and then he will repay everyone for what has been done. 28 Truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.’

This is the gospel of the Lord.

All say: Praise to you, O Christ.

All sing: Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia!

Sermon

They had his name right but his identity wrong.

Matthew 16.21-28

Peter seemed to have had a problem with Jesus, just who is he? He had been teaching, healing and involved in conflict with religious leaders for some time. Crowds had been coming out to see Him, and Jesus was the hot topic of conversation. He was a first-century celebrity. And celebrities, then as now, were the objects of rumour and speculation. Just look on social media to see what I mean.

Jesus asked His disciples “Who do people say that I am?” He wanted to know what people had been saying. Evidently, Jesus had been getting some Face-Book or twitter type coverage, so the apostles told Jesus what had been doing the rounds. Rumour had it He was the reincarnation of Elijah or of his own cousin, John the Baptist. You can imagine the headlines. Sounds bizarre, but rumours about celebrities are often like that, aren’t they?

Turning to Peter, Jesus brought the question closer to home. “Who do you say that I am?” It’s one thing to talk about other people’s opinions and speculations. It’s quite another to go on record by expressing your own. Jesus wouldn’t allow Peter that safety. He asked him, “Who do you say that I am?” That was, and remains, the central question of Christian faith. It’s not, “Do you agree with my teachings?” It’s not, “Do you think I manage conflict with the authorities well?” Nor is it, “Are you impressed with the miracles you’ve seen me perform?” The fundamental question is a question of identity: “Who do you say that I am?”

Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, Son of the Living God.” When Peter made that statement, that confession, Jesus blessed him and made a striking claim: “Flesh and blood did not reveal this to you, but my Father who is in heaven.” In other words, “Peter, you didn’t learn this from the rumours or because of human insight. You didn’t learn this or reason your way to this truth. This knowledge was not discovered, but revealed. It is not a work of the human mind, but a gift from God.”

Peter was the first to confess his faith in the great truth about Jesus. Apparently he confessed better than he realised. Sometimes a person who is completely right can be deplorably wrong. Remember your maths teacher, “It’s not enough to have the right answer. You need to know how to get there.”

Peter was right when he confessed Jesus as the Messiah, Son of the Living God. But when it came to understanding just what that meant, he tried to use a flawed formula instead of listening to God’s revelation.

Shortly after Peter’s great confession, Jesus began to speak to His disciples about events to come. That he would go to Jerusalem, face rejection, suffer shame at the hands of the authorities, be executed, and then be raised on the third day. Peter was appalled. He thought he already knew what it meant to be the Messiah. After all, he knew what his people needed. He knew what others had taught about what the Messiah would be like. The Messiah was God’s answer to the people’s problems. He was the rightful sovereign of a wrong-filled world. That much was true.

What Peter was not prepared to accept was that the Messiah would right the wrongs of the world not by gloriously trampling on Roman occupation, but by means of an apparent defeat and a humiliating death of His own. A beat up, hung up, dead and buried Messiah was about as far as anything could be from what Peter meant when he confessed to Jesus, “You are the Messiah, Son of the Living God.”

So when Jesus spoke of His coming suffering, Peter found it unbearable. He pulled Jesus aside and tried to set Him straight. As one translator puts it, Peter said, “Grace is yours, Lord; may this suffering never happen to you.” No doubt Peter meant well. But Jesus’ response was swift and sharp. “Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; for you are setting your mind not on divine things, but on human things.”

This same Peter, who confessed the truth about Jesus, given by divine revelation, tried to define the meaning and mission of Christ. But he seriously blundered because he attempted to define the Messiah by means of human needs and ideas. Jesus denounced this as Satanic. Peter was only the first of many who have rightly named Jesus “the Messiah, Son of the Living God,” and then offered definitions of the Messiah that have little to do with what God intends. How we define the Messiah makes all the difference in the world with how we follow Him.

If we define the Messiah strictly as a teacher, then all we need to do is tune-up our thinking and learn His lessons. If the Messiah is a political revolutionary, intent on overthrowing the unjust powers of the world, then we need to take up arms and let the shooting begin. If the Messiah is a harmless, caring chap, then we need to be careful never to offend or make others uncomfortable with what we say and do.

But the Messiah of the Bible is different from any of these. He was, in the words of scripture, begotten of God. He came from God in a unique and unrepeatable way. There was no one ever like Him before or since. He was not just an engaging teacher, someone who wonderfully cared, or a revolutionary activist. Rather, He came as the saving presence of God, to save by enduring suffering and displaying the depth of divine love.

It was not a pain-free and convenient Messiah that declared, “If any want to be my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me…”

Let’s admit it, we need to know more fully the meaning of the confession “Jesus is the Messiah, Son of the Living God.” Our too-human agendas can get in the way. Our flawed ideas lead us to mistaken conclusions. If we want to know Him more completely and follow Him more faithfully, we need look to Jesus alone to give us the definition of what it means to be the Messiah. Only then will we know how to be His people.

We will miss the truth of His mission and grandeur of His identity if we try to impose our doubtful definitions on Him. It is not enough to voice His name or speak His titles. We need to learn from Him who He is, so we can have a deeper relationship with Him.

Before the next time we confess, “Jesus is the Messiah, Son of the Living God.” we must stop defining him by our limited experiences, human agendas, and dubious assumptions but instead learn from Him then maybe we’ll find that our confession means more than it ever did.

The Rt. Rev'd Maureen Lunn, St Mary Magdalene, Enfield, 30/08/2020

Service Audio

The Nicene Creed

We believe in one God,
the Father, the Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all that is, seen and unseen.

We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,
the only Son of God,
eternally begotten of the Father,
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made, of one Being with the Father;
through him all things were made.
For us and for our salvation
he came down from heaven,
was incarnate from the Holy Spirit
and the Virgin Mary, and was made man.
For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate;
he suffered death and was buried.
On the third day he rose again
in accordance with the Scriptures;
he ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory
to judge the living and the dead,
and his kingdom will have no end.

We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son,
who with the Father and the Son
is worshipped and glorified,
who has spoken through the prophets.

We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.
We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.
We look for the resurrection of the dead,
and the life of the world to come. Amen.

The Intercessions 

The Intercessions list has been circulated with petitions for the Church, The World, The Community, Our Keyworkers, The Sick and the Deceased. The Diocesan Cycle of Prayer is found at:

London Anglican Cycle of Prayer

This or another response may be used:

Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

In the power of the Spirit and in union with Christ, let us pray to the Father.

Almighty God, our heavenly Father, you promised through your Son Jesus Christ to hear us when we pray in faith.

Strengthen N our bishop(s) and all your Church in the service of Christ, that those who confess your name may be united in your truth,
live together in your love, and reveal your glory in the world.

Bless and guide Elizabeth our Queen; give wisdom to all in authority;
and direct this and every nation in the ways of justice and of peace;
that we may honour one another, and seek the common good.

Give grace to us, our families and friends, and to all our neighbours,
that we may serve Christ in one another, and love as he loves us.

Comfort and heal all those who suffer in body, mind, or spirit …;
give them courage and hope in their troubles; and bring them the joy of your salvation.

Hear us as we remember those who have died in the faith of Christ …; according to your promises, grant us with them a share in your eternal kingdom.

Rejoicing in the fellowship of all your saints, we commend ourselves and the whole creation to your unfailing love.

Merciful Father, accept these prayers for the sake of your Son, our Saviour Jesus Christ.  Amen.

The Peace

We are the body of Christ.
In the one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.
Let us then pursue all that makes for peace and builds up our common life.

The peace of the Lord be always with you.

and also with you.

A sign of peace may be exchanged.

As our Saviour taught us, so we pray.

Service Audio

Collect

God of all mercy, in this eucharist you have set aside our sins and given us your healing: grant that we who are made whole in Christ may bring that healing to this broken world, in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Blessing

The peace of God,
which passes all understanding,
keep your hearts and minds
in the knowledge and love of God,
and of his Son Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God almighty,
the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit,
be among you and remain with you always. Amen.

The Dismissal

Go in peace to love and serve the Lord.

In the name of Christ.  Amen.

Recessional Hymn

There’s a wideness in God’s mercy

There’s a wideness in God’s mercy
like the wideness of the sea;
there’s a kindness in his justice
which is more than liberty.

There is no place where earth’s sorrows
are more felt than up in heaven;
there is no place where earth’s failings
have such kindly judgement given.

For the love of God is broader
than the measures of man’s mind;
and the heart of the Eternal
is most wonderfully kind.

But we make his love too narrow
by false limits of our own;
and we magnify his strictness
with a zeal he will not own.

There is plentiful redemption
in the blood that has been shed;
there is joy for all the members
in the sorrows of the Head.

There is grace enough for thousands
of new worlds as great as this;
there is room for fresh creations
in that upper home of bliss.

If our love were but more simple,
we should take him at his word;
and our lives would be all gladness
in the joy of Christ our Lord.

Material from Common Worship 2000 is included in this service and is copyright © The Central Board of Finance of the Church of England.